Menu

A

|

A

5 Ways to Utilize Conference Recordings

Not long ago sessions presented at association conferences were restricted to a limited audience of attendees. Now, with technological advancements that allow for convenient and inexpensive content capture, many associations are exposing their sessions to a much wider audience. Session recordings open doors that would otherwise be seen as obstacles to association goals, and determining a strategy to best take advantage of the unique opportunities of recorded content is crucial to success.

Here are some of the strategies associations are employing to proactively utilize their session recordings once the conference has ended.

  1. Sell it. Whether someone missed the session or simply wants to watch it again, there is an interest in recorded content. Many associations have taken advantage of this demand and monetized their conference recordings to generate non-dues revenue. The profitability of content is evident in its strong presence at every stage of the conference process: from conference registration to the onsite presence and beyond into post-conference promotional emails.
  2. Recruit it. Unfortunately, not all members are able to annually attend association events and conferences. The presented content is not of less value to these individuals, and more and more associations are finding that this group shouldn’t be neglected. They’re finding that utilizing the conference recordings as a complimentary value-add to members is a powerful strategy to promote and retain membership. Distributing the content not only helps members justify membership dues, it also engages them further in association-related topics.
  3. Promote it. What better way to promote conference attendance than by offering previously-recorded content? Attendees prefer face-to-face networking as opposed to online or recorded offerings, so attendance cannibalization is not a threat. However, that certainly doesn’t mean the content is not valuable. For potential attendees whom are undecided, repurposing content recorded in previous years as marketing material can be the boost needed to push them to the registration page.
  4. Teach it. Continuing education opportunities are a resource that an increasing number of associations are becoming involved with. Coupled with technological advances, distance CE learning is now more convenient than ever. In the past, quality continuing education resources have been restricted to onsite, with distance opportunities a cumbersome ordeal whereby participants would mail in a completed document before receiving their certificate, a process that would take several weeks. Now, a participant simply watches a conference recording and completes an online exam to instantly receive a digital certificate.
  5. Track it. Content is critical in the association world, and generating material that is valuable to the association’s constituents should be a priority. Onsite session evaluations are a starting point, but they only scratch the surface. Not only do onsite evaluations represent only a small portion of members, but the feedback is subjective. Viewing analytics can paint a fuller picture with statistics such as the number of viewers and amount of time spent of each session. By factoring in this information, associations can more accurately conclude which topics and presenters are of more value to their constituents in order to improve association content going forward.

5 Ways to Utilize Conference Recordings

Not long ago sessions presented at association conferences were restricted to a limited audience of attendees. Now, with technological advancements that allow for convenient and inexpensive content capture, many associations are exposing their sessions to a much wider audience. Session recordings open doors that would otherwise be seen as obstacles to association goals, and determining a strategy to best take advantage of the unique opportunities of recorded content is crucial to success.

Here are some of the strategies associations are employing to proactively utilize their session recordings once the conference has ended.

  1. Sell it. Whether someone missed the session or simply wants to watch it again, there is an interest in recorded content. Many associations have taken advantage of this demand and monetized their conference recordings to generate non-dues revenue. The profitability of content is evident in its strong presence at every stage of the conference process: from conference registration to the onsite presence and beyond into post-conference promotional emails.
  2. Recruit it. Unfortunately, not all members are able to annually attend association events and conferences. The presented content is not of less value to these individuals, and more and more associations are finding that this group shouldn’t be neglected. They’re finding that utilizing the conference recordings as a complimentary value-add to members is a powerful strategy to promote and retain membership. Distributing the content not only helps members justify membership dues, it also engages them further in association-related topics.
  3. Promote it. What better way to promote conference attendance than by offering previously-recorded content? Attendees prefer face-to-face networking as opposed to online or recorded offerings, so attendance cannibalization is not a threat. However, that certainly doesn’t mean the content is not valuable. For potential attendees whom are undecided, repurposing content recorded in previous years as marketing material can be the boost needed to push them to the registration page.
  4. Teach it. Continuing education opportunities are a resource that an increasing number of associations are becoming involved with. Coupled with technological advances, distance CE learning is now more convenient than ever. In the past, quality continuing education resources have been restricted to onsite, with distance opportunities a cumbersome ordeal whereby participants would mail in a completed document before receiving their certificate, a process that would take several weeks. Now, a participant simply watches a conference recording and completes an online exam to instantly receive a digital certificate.
  5. Track it. Content is critical in the association world, and generating material that is valuable to the association’s constituents should be a priority. Onsite session evaluations are a starting point, but they only scratch the surface. Not only do onsite evaluations represent only a small portion of members, but the feedback is subjective. Viewing analytics can paint a fuller picture with statistics such as the number of viewers and amount of time spent of each session. By factoring in this information, associations can more accurately conclude which topics and presenters are of more value to their constituents in order to improve association content going forward.